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Christians in China Must Prepare as They Face Persecution Under New Regulation

By Britta Milovansev-DOHI News

China cracks down on Christians after new Religious Affairs Regulations were put into effect on February 1, 2018.

China’s Henan province, under Jia Ruigin, the Director of Henan Provincial Religious Affairs Bureau, has been especially hit hard. Ruigin has ordered a full implementation of the new regulations, forbidding Christians “not to engage in religious activities in places unregistered with the religious authorities.”

According to ChinaAid, 19 towns across Henan province have witnessed a crackdown on Christians as government officials are going door-to-door urging Christians to attend the government-censored Three-Self Church instead of their unregistered house churches, urging them to remove religious posters and crosses from their homes.

These new measures have put all areas of the country on edge as the religious wait to see how strictly the new regulations will be enforced.

Ying Fuk-tsang, director of The Chinese University of Hong Kong told ucanews that much would depend on how lower- and higher-level Communist officials implement the details of the amended Regulations for Religious Affairs.

Ying said believers being subjected to the new regulations should become knowledgeable about legal options to challenge unfair treatment.

According to Chinasource, Pastor Wing Yi, house church pastor of Early Rain Church in Chengdu, Sichuan Province warns Christians in China of upcoming pressure. Wang Yi says the new regulations are a violation of religious freedom that go even further down the road of violating the constitution and should therefore be resisted by Christians in China.

“It is an illegal law. Freedom of religion and faith is a basic right of citizens in the constitution. The State Council has no right to establish administrative license and impose administrative restrictions on citizens’ constitutional rights.

The regulations are a continuation of principles and systems of religious administration dating to the Cultural Revolution. This is an ugly, anti-rule of law, anti-constitutional product of that time.

Under the old regulations most house churches’ normal gathering and worship fell outside the old regulations’ jurisdiction. Now, however, our government has deemed that citizens’ individual and collective religious freedom inherently conflicts with national interests

The regulations are a continuation of principles and systems of religious administration dating to the Cultural Revolution. This is an ugly, anti-rule of law, anti-constitutional product of that time.

If the government is really so ambitious that it wants to create a system of religious control unprecedented these last 40 years—for the sake of brief political benefits and speculation—then it will be responsible to history and the people, and to everyone with reasonable expectations of the Religious Affairs Bureau,” said Wang Yi.

Since the implementation of the new Regulations many Christians across China are meeting secretly in their homes, fearful of the public security agents.